things about selkies

Bonus crossover freebie!

something-shiny2After I’d got assorted novellas off my plate in December, I got momentarily waylaid from my next project. At the time, I was working on a new vampire story, got sidetracked by pirates and slaves in another world, and all of a sudden, I’d written  a crossover prequel with the Past and Present Tense series and Tempest Trilogy.

A selkie and a drag queen walk into a wildlife preserve cabin… and a long forgotten debt brings two strangers together to save a life.

Ren was a marine biologist specializing in seals. Finn turns into a seal. They both live on the BC coast. It was bound to happen… Of course, there’s magic involved and it’s not just a random encounter. Stepping back into Finn’s point of view was like pulling on your favourite hoodie. I’d been working on edits for the sequel to Coral, No Mortal Business, which is coming out at the end of January, and Finn’s voice came easily. It was interesting to write the Ren that Colin didn’t see, though. He was a lot more self-aware than Colin gave him credit for.

You can download “Something Shiny In The Distance” for free from Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, or the Apple iBook store, but Amazon is being a pain about price matching, so it’s still showing up there as the default price of $2.99.

And now back to my current project, a story about a movie star, his supernaturally-competent personal assistant, and a runaway kid. It was supposed to be a short novella for an anthology call, but I’m already at 17,000 words and things are rapidly scaling up to novel proportions. Pirates and vampires? Both still languishing half-finished and mostly-finished, respectively. But I’m sure I’ll come back to them once I’ve got the movie star sorted out.

Selkie sighting

There’s a new movie from the same team that did The Secret of Kells, and it looks just gorgeous. Oh, and it’s about selkies. I’ve mentioned it before, but there’s a much longer trailer out now. I don’t think Finn would approve, given that the selkie mother, well, does what selkie mothers traditionally do, but I would want to see it even just for the artwork alone, never mind the story, which looks intriguing.  Check out The Song of the Sea:

Seventh Miscellaneous Selkie Link: Song of the Sea

To celebrate the release of my new book, Coral Were His Bones, I’m going to be posting a month’s worth of things about selkies. Coral is a m/m paranormal erotica novel about Finn, a selkie who’s in love with his childhood sweetheart Devon, but bound in a magical contract to a cruel master. It’s a story of modern magic, snark, sex, and how to heal when everything hurts.

Another movie! This one, Song of the Sea, is from the same people who did The Secret of Kells. Here’s the blurb:

An animated feature film from Oscar nominated Tomm Moore, SONG OF THE SEA tells the story of Ben and his little sister Saoirse — the last Seal-child — who embark on a fantastic journey across a fading world of ancient legend and magic in an attempt to return to their home by the sea. The film takes inspiration from the mythological Selkies of Irish folklore, who live as seals in the sea but become humans on land. SONG OF THE SEA features the voices of Brendan Gleeson, Fionnula Flanagan, David Rawle, Lisa Hannigan, Pat Shortt, Jon Kenny, Lucy O’Connell, Liam Hourican and Kevin Swierszsz. Music is by composer Bruno Coulais and Irish band Kíla, both of whom previously collaborated on The Secret of Kells.

I really enjoyed The Secret of Kells, which took plain old 2D animation in this age of visually stunning big budget movies from Pixar and Disney, and turned it something that let the art tell a complex story in and of itself. It’s full of allusions to history and mythology, like the obvious, the Book of Kells itself (there’s some more comparison with the movie in this video), but there are all sorts of other little bits like Pangur Ban, the cat named after a 9th century Irish monk’s poem about his cat, or Crom Cruach, the monster with roots in Celtic mythology. There are some plot holes–Finn would be horrified at part of the ending. Devon wouldn’t understand why he couldn’t understand why Finn couldn’t appreciate the beauty and the craftsmanship and Finn would be upset at even a moment’s loss between loved ones. And he flat out refuses to watch Song of the Sea. Not until he finds his mom.

But selkie sensibilities aside, The Song of the Sea looks just as stylized and gorgeous, in its own way. Here’s the trailer:

And that’s the last selkie link! Thanks for joining me for the month–we now return you to my usual posts about writing, my latest projects, and whatever else catches my attention. (Spoiler alert–I’ve been watching a lot of science videos on Youtube lately…) I may do a similar sort of themed links for my next book in July, Changeling, although maybe not seven links a week. What do you think?

Sixth Miscellaneous Selkie links: knitting patterns

To celebrate the release of my new book, Coral Were His Bones, I’m going to be posting a month’s worth of things about selkies. Coral is a m/m paranormal erotica novel about Finn, a selkie who’s in love with his childhood sweetheart Devon, but bound in a magical contract to a cruel master. It’s a story of modern magic, snark, sex, and how to heal when everything hurts.

I don’t knit, but my partner does. I can’t imagine how she makes a whole sock out of a single row of loops, but then again, I start a novel with a single sentence. Besides, I get cotton socks and fingerless mitts out of the deal. I just can’t do wool. I’ve tried, but I’m pretty texture-sensitive.

She’s found me a couple knitting patterns named after selkies,  socks with a seaweed pattern, and a chunky cabled sweater that could almost be a seal skin. I still like Havari’s sweater in Coral

Fifth Miscellaneous Selkie Link: The Selkie Bride on youtube

To celebrate the release of my new book, Coral Were His Bones, I’m going to be posting a month’s worth of things about selkies. Coral is a m/m paranormal erotica novel about Finn, a selkie who’s in love with his childhood sweetheart Devon, but bound in a magical contract to a cruel master. It’s a story of modern magic, snark, sex, and how to heal when everything hurts.

We’re detouring back to more traditional folklore today, via Youtube again, with The Selkie Bride, a traditional Scottish folk story animated by Walter McCrorie. Enjoy!

 

Fourth Miscellaneous Selkie Link: Lost Girl

To celebrate the release of my new book, Coral Were His Bones, I’m going to be posting a month’s worth of things about selkies. Coral is a m/m paranormal erotica novel about Finn, a selkie who’s in love with his childhood sweetheart Devon, but bound in a magical contract to a cruel master. It’s a story of modern magic, snark, sex, and how to heal when everything hurts.

Today’s a bit of a stretch, but bear with me… Airing on Showcase in Canada and SyFy in the States, Lost Girl is a series about a succubus, not a selkie, but there is a selkie episode in the second season. There’s a lot to like about the series. Bo, the main character, is a succubus raised by humans who is just now discovering the world her mother came from, and her own powers, running around with her human bestie and solving supernatural crimes.

Bisexual character where her bisexuality isn’t a thing she agonizes over! Girls kissing,! Sex-positive! Female friendships–this show definitely passes the Bechdel test, and best friend Kenzi is kick-ass and adorable. An awesome balance of cheesy and serious, with that balance of magic and mundane that I enjoy so very much! Need more convincing? Here are Ten Good Reasons To Watch Lost Girl from IO9

“Fae Gone Wild,” episode 2×07, mixes a fae strip club with selkie mythology. Even though it’s not one of my favourite episodes, it’s still fun.

Third miscellaneous selkie link: The Secret of Roan Inish

To celebrate the release of my new book, Coral Were His Bones, I’m going to be posting a month’s worth of things about selkies. Coral is a m/m paranormal erotica novel about Finn, a selkie who’s in love with his childhood sweetheart Devon, but bound in a magical contract to a cruel master. It’s a story of modern magic, snark, sex, and how to heal when everything hurts.

A lot of modern North American kids first heard about selkies from the movie The Secret of Roan Inish, which came out in 1995. It’s the story of a young girl in Ireland in the 1940’s who’s sent to live with her grandparents after the death of her mother, where she first learns the legends of the selkies, and how it may have something to do with her own family’s history.

The movie is based on a 1950’s children’s book, and was originally set in Scotland. If you’re curious on the translation from book to film, head over to Seaweed Soup: The Secret (Ingredients) of Roan Inish. You can also watch the trailer below on Youtube, or check out Roger Ebert’s review