Tempest series

Frozen carrot cake slaw

I grew up in the North. I was born in Yellowknife and grew up in Slave Lake, so when it got to about 25 degrees, I melted. Here in Lethbridge, it cools off to 25 degrees at night.

For dinner tonight we shredded some carrots and flaked coconut in the high powered blender we have, blitzed frozen pineapple into pineapple snow, then added almond meal, raisins, chocolate chips, vanilla, cinnamon, and nutmeg. There are no quantities because it’s a “some” recipe. The only thing I can say is use about half as much chocolate chips as you think you need. a quarter cup did the whole big bowl. Tomorrow I’m going to take the leftovers, add an egg and some flour and make them into pancakes.

This reminds me that I need to make Devon cook for Finn more than he does in book three.

Seventh Miscellaneous Selkie Link: Song of the Sea

To celebrate the release of my new book, Coral Were His Bones, I’m going to be posting a month’s worth of things about selkies. Coral is a m/m paranormal erotica novel about Finn, a selkie who’s in love with his childhood sweetheart Devon, but bound in a magical contract to a cruel master. It’s a story of modern magic, snark, sex, and how to heal when everything hurts.

Another movie! This one, Song of the Sea, is from the same people who did The Secret of Kells. Here’s the blurb:

An animated feature film from Oscar nominated Tomm Moore, SONG OF THE SEA tells the story of Ben and his little sister Saoirse — the last Seal-child — who embark on a fantastic journey across a fading world of ancient legend and magic in an attempt to return to their home by the sea. The film takes inspiration from the mythological Selkies of Irish folklore, who live as seals in the sea but become humans on land. SONG OF THE SEA features the voices of Brendan Gleeson, Fionnula Flanagan, David Rawle, Lisa Hannigan, Pat Shortt, Jon Kenny, Lucy O’Connell, Liam Hourican and Kevin Swierszsz. Music is by composer Bruno Coulais and Irish band Kíla, both of whom previously collaborated on The Secret of Kells.

I really enjoyed The Secret of Kells, which took plain old 2D animation in this age of visually stunning big budget movies from Pixar and Disney, and turned it something that let the art tell a complex story in and of itself. It’s full of allusions to history and mythology, like the obvious, the Book of Kells itself (there’s some more comparison with the movie in this video), but there are all sorts of other little bits like Pangur Ban, the cat named after a 9th century Irish monk’s poem about his cat, or Crom Cruach, the monster with roots in Celtic mythology. There are some plot holes–Finn would be horrified at part of the ending. Devon wouldn’t understand why he couldn’t understand why Finn couldn’t appreciate the beauty and the craftsmanship and Finn would be upset at even a moment’s loss between loved ones. And he flat out refuses to watch Song of the Sea. Not until he finds his mom.

But selkie sensibilities aside, The Song of the Sea looks just as stylized and gorgeous, in its own way. Here’s the trailer:

And that’s the last selkie link! Thanks for joining me for the month–we now return you to my usual posts about writing, my latest projects, and whatever else catches my attention. (Spoiler alert–I’ve been watching a lot of science videos on Youtube lately…) I may do a similar sort of themed links for my next book in July, Changeling, although maybe not seven links a week. What do you think?

Sixth Miscellaneous Selkie links: knitting patterns

To celebrate the release of my new book, Coral Were His Bones, I’m going to be posting a month’s worth of things about selkies. Coral is a m/m paranormal erotica novel about Finn, a selkie who’s in love with his childhood sweetheart Devon, but bound in a magical contract to a cruel master. It’s a story of modern magic, snark, sex, and how to heal when everything hurts.

I don’t knit, but my partner does. I can’t imagine how she makes a whole sock out of a single row of loops, but then again, I start a novel with a single sentence. Besides, I get cotton socks and fingerless mitts out of the deal. I just can’t do wool. I’ve tried, but I’m pretty texture-sensitive.

She’s found me a couple knitting patterns named after selkies,  socks with a seaweed pattern, and a chunky cabled sweater that could almost be a seal skin. I still like Havari’s sweater in Coral

Fifth Miscellaneous Selkie Link: The Selkie Bride on youtube

To celebrate the release of my new book, Coral Were His Bones, I’m going to be posting a month’s worth of things about selkies. Coral is a m/m paranormal erotica novel about Finn, a selkie who’s in love with his childhood sweetheart Devon, but bound in a magical contract to a cruel master. It’s a story of modern magic, snark, sex, and how to heal when everything hurts.

We’re detouring back to more traditional folklore today, via Youtube again, with The Selkie Bride, a traditional Scottish folk story animated by Walter McCrorie. Enjoy!

 

Fourth Miscellaneous Selkie Link: Lost Girl

To celebrate the release of my new book, Coral Were His Bones, I’m going to be posting a month’s worth of things about selkies. Coral is a m/m paranormal erotica novel about Finn, a selkie who’s in love with his childhood sweetheart Devon, but bound in a magical contract to a cruel master. It’s a story of modern magic, snark, sex, and how to heal when everything hurts.

Today’s a bit of a stretch, but bear with me… Airing on Showcase in Canada and SyFy in the States, Lost Girl is a series about a succubus, not a selkie, but there is a selkie episode in the second season. There’s a lot to like about the series. Bo, the main character, is a succubus raised by humans who is just now discovering the world her mother came from, and her own powers, running around with her human bestie and solving supernatural crimes.

Bisexual character where her bisexuality isn’t a thing she agonizes over! Girls kissing,! Sex-positive! Female friendships–this show definitely passes the Bechdel test, and best friend Kenzi is kick-ass and adorable. An awesome balance of cheesy and serious, with that balance of magic and mundane that I enjoy so very much! Need more convincing? Here are Ten Good Reasons To Watch Lost Girl from IO9

“Fae Gone Wild,” episode 2×07, mixes a fae strip club with selkie mythology. Even though it’s not one of my favourite episodes, it’s still fun.

Third miscellaneous selkie link: The Secret of Roan Inish

To celebrate the release of my new book, Coral Were His Bones, I’m going to be posting a month’s worth of things about selkies. Coral is a m/m paranormal erotica novel about Finn, a selkie who’s in love with his childhood sweetheart Devon, but bound in a magical contract to a cruel master. It’s a story of modern magic, snark, sex, and how to heal when everything hurts.

A lot of modern North American kids first heard about selkies from the movie The Secret of Roan Inish, which came out in 1995. It’s the story of a young girl in Ireland in the 1940’s who’s sent to live with her grandparents after the death of her mother, where she first learns the legends of the selkies, and how it may have something to do with her own family’s history.

The movie is based on a 1950’s children’s book, and was originally set in Scotland. If you’re curious on the translation from book to film, head over to Seaweed Soup: The Secret (Ingredients) of Roan Inish. You can also watch the trailer below on Youtube, or check out Roger Ebert’s review

Second miscellaneous selkie link: sculpture

To celebrate the release of my new book, Coral Were His Bones, I’m going to be posting a month’s worth of things about selkies. Coral is a m/m paranormal erotica novel about Finn, a selkie who’s in love with his childhood sweetheart Devon, but bound in a magical contract to a cruel master. It’s a story of modern magic, snark, sex, and how to heal when everything hurts.

Today, I’ve stumbled across some artwork–seals and selkies in handsculpted clay from Scottish artist Susan McInnes. As you look through the seals in her gallery, you’ll find a few that aren’t… quite all seal. There’s something very tactile about her work that makes me want to pick it up! There’s a bit of a folklore recap there, too.

First miscellaneous selkie link: poetry

To celebrate the release of my new book, Coral Were His Bones, I’m going to be posting a month’s worth of things about selkies. Coral is a m/m paranormal erotica novel about Finn, a selkie who’s in love with his childhood sweetheart Devon, but bound in a magical contract to a cruel master. It’s a story of modern magic, snark, sex, and how to heal when everything hurts.

I can only call this last week’s theme miscellaneous–or maybe mixed media!

I have a poem for you today, “The Selkie Wife’s Daughter” by Jeannie Hall Gailey, published on The Endicott Studio’s website. Founded in 1987, The Endicott Studio is a nonprofit organization dedicated to literary, visual, and performance arts inspired by myth, folklore, fairy tales, and the oral storytelling tradition. It’s easy to lose an afternoon in the archives of fiction, poetry, and other art, not to mention the decade’s worth of articles from The Journal of Mythic Arts, if you’re of an academic bent. Fantasy fans will recognize many of the author names–Jane Yolen, Neil Gaiman, Terri Windling, Delia Sherman and Midori Snyder, to name a few.

Seventh (and more) selkie books: other Loose Id authors

To celebrate the release of my new book, Coral Were His Bones, I’m going to be posting a month’s worth of things about selkies. Coral is a m/m paranormal erotica novel about Finn, a selkie who’s in love with his childhood sweetheart Devon, but bound in a magical contract to a cruel master. It’s a story of modern magic, snark, sex, and how to heal when everything hurts.

For my last day of selkie books, I’ve got three author Loose Id authors to feature. Yes, there are four of us from the same publisher writing m/m selkie erotica! Is that enough to officially call it a sub-genre?

spindriftSpindrift by Jules Jones

When myth comes to life, love becomes legendary…

Writer Richard Dunn’s managed to get himself accepted by the fishermen in the village he lives in for half the year. Just how well accepted he doesn’t realize, until the night he stumbles on an argument involving a local man he hasn’t met before–and finds himself asked to give a silkie a bed for the night.

Niall is a silkie. A creature of legend–a seal, able to become human by removing his skin and to become seal again by slipping it back on. That’s a bit of a problem, since Niall’s seal-skin has been stolen by a man in love with Niall’s sister. The thief will only give it back in exchange for his sister’s, which means he’s trapped in human form. Unless he betrays her, or his friends find his skin.

Trapped ashore, with no official identity and no bank accounts, Niall needs a refuge. His human friends think that a wealthy writer with a known ability to respect other people’s secrets might be just the ticket. All the better that both of them are gay and single…
But Richard’s only too aware of the legends of silkie women abducted and forced to marry land men. It’s hard to ignore the old tale, when one of the fishermen has just made a bid to re-enact it. It’s not an example Richard wants to follow. He’s determined to help Niall get his skin back, even if it costs him the love of a lifetime.”

Under His Skin 1: Tease by Mina Kelly

“When Barnabas rescues a stranger from a storm, he knows he’s in for a tempestuous time. Lust wars with more altruistic feelings to paralyze Barnabas until the stranger makes the first move for him — and then there’s no stopping either of them.
Inside, outside, against the wall, and even occasionally on the bed. But Barnabas starts to wonder if the sex is a distraction from something more important, something his English language challenged new lover isn’t saying. When the truth is finally revealed, the betrayal cuts deep, and for Barnabas, it may be too little, too late.”

The Brotherhood 10: Salt of the… Earth? by Willa Okati

“Alex is hot, he’s hip, and he knows how to play the dating game. A former male escort and current valet, his firm look but don’t touch policy is wreaking havoc on his personal life. He’s out at Amour Magique with one goal in mind: find someone absolutely down to earth, have a fabulous night, and hopefully get laid.

What he finds is Dylan.

Dylan, with his sparkling green eyes, impish sense of humor and fascination with sports is exactly what Alex wants. They’re set to have a wonderful time when Alex discovers that the man he thought was the salt of the earth isn’t actually from terra firma at all.

And Alex knows what kind of creature Dylan is.

A selkie.”

One more week of links, and it’s a random assortment of what I can only call mixed media!

Sixth selkie book: False Mermaid by Erin Hart

To celebrate the release of my new book, Coral Were His Bones, I’m going to be posting a month’s worth of things about selkies. Coral is a m/m paranormal erotica novel about Finn, a selkie who’s in love with his childhood sweetheart Devon, but bound in a magical contract to a cruel master. It’s a story of modern magic, snark, sex, and how to heal when everything hurts.

I’ve got a mystery for you today–it’s book three of a series that combines forensics, archaeology, and history with Irish myth and mystery, False Mermaid by Erin Hart.

false-mermaid“American pathologist Nora Gavin fled to Ireland three years ago, hoping that distance from home would bring her peace. Though she threw herself into the study of bog bodies and the mysteries of their circumstances, she was ultimately led back to the one mystery she was unable to solve: the murder of her sister, Tríona. Nora can’t move forward until she goes back—back to her home, to the scene of the crime, to the source of her nightmares and her deepest regrets. Determined to put her sister’s case to rest and anxious about her eleven-year-old niece, Elizabeth, Nora returns to Saint Paul, Minnesota, to find that her brother-in-law, Peter Hallett, is about to remarry and has plans to leave the country with his new bride.

Nora has long suspected Hallett in Tríona’s murder, though there has never been any proof of his involvement, and now she believes that his new wife and Elizabeth may both be in danger. Time is short, and as Nora begins reinvestigating her sister’s death, missed clues and ever-more disturbing details come to light. What is the significance of the “false mermaid” seeds found on Tríona’s body? Why was her behavior so erratic in the days before her murder? Is there a link between Tríona’s death and that of another young woman? Nora’s search for answers takes her from the banks of the Mississippi to the cliffs of Ireland, where the eerie story of a fisherman’s wife who vanished more than a century ago offers up uncanny parallels.

As painful secrets come to light, Nora is drawn deeper into a past that still threatens to engulf her and must determine how much she is prepared to sacrifice to put one tragedy to rest . . . and to make sure that history doesn’t repeat itself.”